The Reset

It was finally Friday and I was exhausted from the week. I was suffering from the classic symptoms, a demanding work schedule, pushing myself too hard and lack of sleep. Once again, I turned down plans with friends feeling too wiped out and guilty taking time for me when there was so much to do and not enough time for the kids. My kids could see it too, as I was getting crabby and inpatient. They could see the crash coming before I could. I resorted to a 30-minute power nap, hoping I would feel better. What I woke up to surprised me.

My 10-year-old daughter Olivia was standing by my phone as the alarm blared. She had a sly smile on her face. There were several post-it notes plastered all over my bathroom, each part of an important message.  A plea for me to not miss out on a night out with my girlfriends. Ideas on who they could stay with for a last-minute plan. An outfit was hanging on the rack ready to put on, all the way down to the shoes and purse. Olivia looked at me and said “Mom, your friends are going to start calling you waterfall because of how many rain checks you take.” Feeling a little refreshed, I realized how much I had put off friend plans and time for myself. It was time to take her advice.

That night as I sat with my other girls, the fabulous friends who I could relate to and laugh with, I remembered the advice that I’ve shared with so many before. We all need a reset sometimes to get our balance back on track. Getting to the bottom of what we need requires us to remember a few important things. Activities that reduce our stress don’t always make us feel fulfilled or recharged. For instance, exercise reduces my stress, but being creative designing handbags makes me feel recharged. Spending quality time with my family makes me feel fulfilled. Recognizing what each of these activities does for us is important to ensure that we do more of what we need at the time to get ourselves back on track.

The next morning, I made a commitment to myself to work on my reset. I pulled out a chart that I had prepared for a woman I was coaching to restore her balance. I remembered that resets don’t happen by osmosis. We have to be thoughtful on what is needed at the time to make it happen. We have to care as much about ourselves as we do for our families and our careers. We’re worth it and we deserve it.

Most importantly, we have to work to make it happen. Creating structure and a plan gives us more opportunity to be successful to get the results we want. When we do, the payoff is huge. We start to feel like the person we want to be and our motivation to be our best is restored.
Here is my Reset Tool for you to use and share with others:

resetchart